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Health & Nutrition

Health and Nutrition

Lower Cholesterol Naturally

Posted August 29th, 2007.

Lower Cholesterol Naturally

Here is a list of things that you can do to lower cholesterol naturally:

  • Reduce the amount of saturated fat you eat. The richest sources of saturated fat (fat that is usually solid at room temperature) in the diet are dairy foods, especially whole milk, cheese, butter and cream. (except the fat-free versions) Red meat is also high in saturated fat
  • Avoid trans fatty acids (TFAs). If you find “partially hydrogenated oil” listed in the ingredient list on food labels, DO NOT buy it! There are many healthier spreads available on the market today that are free from trans fatty acids. Trans-fat is also found in snack foods like chips, crackers and cookies. It is found in the oils used to cook fast food french fries, doughnuts and movie popcorn
  • Substitute soy protein for animal protein / meat. The protein in soy foods have been shown to lower cholesterol levels. Try to incorporate two servings a day into your meals. Choose from tofu, tempeh, soy milk, whole soy beans, and roasted soy nuts.
  • Use fresh garlic regularly in your meals. Garlic has been shown to lower both cholesterol levels and blood pressure — and it tastes wonderful, too. Try using one or two lightly cooked cloves a day.
  • Drink green tea daily. The antioxidants in green tea help lower cholesterol and prevent the cholesterol in your blood from oxidizing. The Japenese have been using this for centuries and for very good reason.
  • Eat plenty of soluble fiber. Soluble fiber has a powerful cholesterol-lowering effect. The best sources of soluble fiber are beans and lentils, apples, citrus fruits, oats, barley, peas, carrots – especially do not forget ground flax seed.
  • Lose weight. Even a modest amount of weight loss can lower cholesterol levels.


Natural Diabetes Treatment

Posted August 29th, 2007.

Natural Diabetes Treatment

Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert
sugar, starches, and other food into the energy. The mechanisms that cause diabetes are known, but what triggers the process is a unknown. Genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise appear to play roles.

The complications of Type II diabetes are very dangerous. These complications include heart disease, high blood pressure (which is twice as common in diabetics), strokes or cerebrovascular disease (mortality rates from this disease are three-to-five times higher in diabetics) and peripheral vascular disease. Also, common in diabetics are retinopathy (diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision impairment in the U.S.), neuropathies and nephrology.

What can people do to improve your blood glucose levels and prevent complications from diabetes?

  • Lose weight if you are overweight. Excess body fat causes the body cells to become resistant to insulin.
  • Eat small, frequent meals to keep blood sugars in a healthy range. Eating large meals can flood the bloodstream with glucose and insulin.
  • Keep starches and sugars to a minimum, choosing those with a low glycemic index.
  • Keep saturated fat and trans fat to a minimum, but have moderate amounts of monounsaturated rich oils like olive oil.
  • Eat fish several times a week, emphasizing those cold water fish high in omega-fatty acids, like salmon and sardines.
  • Eat generous amounts of non-starchy vegetables.
  • Increase your activity level. Aerobic activity improves insulin resistance in muscle cells, which allows more glucose to enter the cells.